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concussedperspective:

chronicpainwarrior:

genoshaisforlovers:

silversarcasm:

[Image: Tweet by Ken Jennings, @KenJennings, which reads

"Nothing sadder than a hot person in a wheelchair"]

ah yes because being disabled immediately makes someone undesirable ¬_¬

What fucking shit

what the fuck

the little fucking shit

And, as if that alone isn’t bad enough, look how many people retweeted or favourited it.

(Source: altlivacrossthebridge)

knitted-pigeons asked:

Hello! I know this isn't the loveliest of questions, but in your UN child morality post you said that one of the preventable diseases that 1/3 of children die from is diarrhea. I know diarrhea is disgusting and unpleasant and all, but how do you die from it?

fishingboatproceeds:

You die from diarrhea because of dehydration. Sometimes kids have diarrhea that requires IV hydration, for instance, and there’s very little of that available in rural areas in the developing world. There are much better rehydration solutions than there used to be, but the only good solution is 1. better sanitation so toilets don’t flow into water that gets used for drinking, and 2. clean water. 

When he was 2, my son had a diarrhea illness (campylobacter) that in the developing world could’ve proven fatal, but he was fine because he lives in the U.S. and we can go to CVS and buy Pedialyte, and if we couldn’t keep him hydrated, we would’ve taken him to the hospital. Bugs that cause childhood diarrhea are almost never fatal in the U.S., but more than half a million kids under five are going to die of diarrheal illnesses for want of clean waters, good toilets, and antibiotics that cost 20 cents per dose.

It’s infuriating. I saw a boy in Ethiopia who was extremely sick and possibly dying because of diarrhea, and it’s just so needless. He probably had rotavirus, and there’s a rotavirus vaccine, but it costs $2.50, which means many communities can’t provide it.

I am so angry about that boy’s needless suffering. I am so outraged about the needless deaths of millions of children every year. The progress in health outcomes in Ethiopia and many other countries in the developing world over the last 20 years is astounding. It’s unprecedented in human history. But we need to invest much more to get people in the developing world the basic resources they need to afford the 20-cent antibiotics and the $2.50 vaccines. 

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting

fishingboatproceeds:

I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.

effyeahnerdfighters:

EBOLA! (…meningitis)

In which John is diagnosed with ebola by the Internet but turns out to be suffering from viral meningitis. How should we imagine novel diseases and how should we combat them? And why do we only focus on diseases that we fear will affect “us”? How does the way we imagine “us” shape the way we respond to disease outbreaks? Questions like that are examined while meningitis headaches are lamented.

thehpalliance:

We are deeply saddened by Robin Williams’ passing and join the world in mourning him.

When the people who help us fight off dementors fall victim to their effects, hope and happiness can seem almost unattainable. We are all so indebted to the entertainers of the world that it seems only logical that the universe should give at least a fraction of their brightness back to them. Instead, they too often face darkness so deep that remembering to turn on the light isn’t always an option.

Robin Williams’ work as a comedian, actor, and philanthropist reached millions. Whether it was as Genie, John Keating, Peter Pan, Theodore Roosevelt, or just as Robin, he brought the world a unique and invaluable happiness. It was he who said that “comedy is acting out optimism.” Though the world knew him for that optimism, behind the scenes he was battling his own dementors.

These moments of shock give us the chance to move forward with open minds and open hearts. For so many, seeking help is an insurmountable task. Having people listen and understand can be the strongest patronus there is.

As we navigate this difficult news, we can work to make the truth stronger by speaking more honestly and listening more openly. We can honor Robin Williams by driving out not just our own dementors, but each others’.

The weapon we have is love.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Online Crisis Chat: http://www.crisischat.org/

Crisis Text Line: http://www.crisistextline.org/textline/

colorsofsocialjustice:

contra-indication:

spondylitis:

The nerve!….This goes out to all the spoonies.

Read this:

My name is Emelie Crecco, I’m 20 years old and I have cystic fibrosis. CF affects the lungs (as of many organs in the body) because of this I have a handicapped sticker. I’m not one to “abuse” the sticker, meaning I use it when I’m having a “bad day” (some days its a little harder to breathe). Today was HOT so I needed to use my sticker. I was running errands all day around my town, I pulled into a handicapped spot, placed the sticker in my mirror and continued into the store. Upon returning to my car I found a note written by someone, it said “Shame on you, you are NOT handicapped. You have taken a space that could have been used by an actually handicapped person. You are a selfish young lady.” I was LIVID. How can someone be so ignorant and cowardly? They clearly saw me walk out of my car, why not approach me? Not all handicaps are visible. I would love for you to share this story. It would help spread awareness for CF, but it would help open people’s minds to what handicapped really is.
Thank you for your time”
~Emelie Crecco

A friend of mine fell over 20 feet and basically broke half his ribs, punctured his lung, broke his arm in three places that required many surgeries to fix and messed up a nerve in his leg. He had to walk with a cane for a long time after it and some lady in a restaurant thought he was just walking with a cane for the hell of it and she ripped it from his hands and grabbed his messed up arm and shook him and told him he was an awful human being for pretending to be handicapped. What the fuck people?

This is what real ableism looks like.

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